×
×
homepage logo

BREAKING NEWS

New housing boom in Blue Earth

City’s HRA and APX Construction building multi-family residences

By Chuck Hunt - Editor | Jan 10, 2021

This duplex in the new Prairie View Subdivision in Blue Earth is nearing completion. The duplex is owned by the Blue Earth Housing and Redevelopment Authority (HRA) and being constructed by APX Construction of Mankato. It is one of seven multi-family residences either under construction or being planned to be built in and around the city of Blue Earth by the HRA and APX Construction.

The Blue Earth City Council continued to make decisions on several housing construction projects around the city.

The city’s Housing and Redevelopment Authority (HRA) and APX Construction of Mankato both have projects underway in various locations in the city.

At their first meeting of 2021, held last Monday night, the City Council took action on several of the projects, as well as heard an update on all of the construction work from city administrator Mary Kennedy.

The council had a second reading of an ordinance which would sell a large lot at the corner of 14th and Moore streets to APX Construction. Their plan is to build a large 20 to 23 unit apartment complex on the site, at an approximate cost of $3 million.

The council voted in favor of the ordinance, paving the way for the sale of the lot from the HRA to APX.

They also had the first reading of an ordinance which would sell two lots in the cul-de-sac area of the new Prairie View Subdivision to APX.

APX plans to build a single duplex on the two lots. They had already previously purchased two lots on the cul-de-sac and a duplex is well underway on those lots. They also plan on purchasing the remaining two lots on the cul-de-sac for a third duplex. The purchase price of all six lots is $109,000.

Meanwhile, construction on three other multi-family residences to be owned by the Blue Earth HRA, but built by APX Construction, are well underway, administrator Kennedy said.

“The one on Blue Stem Drive in the Prairie View Subdivision is basically done, just waiting for garage doors, counter tops and some other items,” Kennedy reported. “The one on Fourth Street is framed up with doors in and the one on Eighth and Rice has the foundation in and just waiting for the framers to get to work.”

The HRA is spending $787,200 on the four-plex at Eighth and Rice streets, $509,960 on the duplex in the Prairie View Subdivision and $418,215 on the duplex on Fourth Street.

In other business at Monday’s meeting, the council:

• Heard from two residents of 10th Street concerning snowplowing on their street.

The two said there are several cars always parked on the street, causing the snowplow to have to go around the cars, piling up additional snow in the street at the end of their driveway.

And the plow might have to come back later and cover the end of their driveway a second time.

The two suggested enforcing no parking on the streets during snow events, but the council took it under advisement, suggested the two file a complaint with the city and also decided to discuss the issue with the Public Works Department, and check with UHD concerning ambulance routes.

• Mayor Rick Scholtes, and three council members, Dan Warner, Glenn Gaylord and John Huisman, who were all reelected in the November election, were sworn into office by city attorney David Frundt.

• Approved the mayor’s appointments to all the city’s boards and commissions, named the Faribault County Register as official newspaper, First Bank Blue Earth as official depository, and CarlsonSV as city auditor.

• Discussed using a Kato Roofing Eagle Eye maintenance program for all the flat roofs owned by the city.

The council decided to check with Public Works supervisor Jamie Holland and to get more price quotes on possible maintenance contracts.

Also discussed a possible curbside leaf pickup program. They looked at what some other cities are doing, but did not take any action, other than to further study the options.

• Accepted a $5,000 donation to the city’s street fund from Randal Schreiner.